Believable

AD 2039: Project Alexandria is an initiative to give all humanity safe and equal access to all recorded knowledge. But one teen knows something is wrong. There are dark intentions behind Project Alexandria and the key may lie in a sonnet titled, “Day Moon”. All of history depends on it.

Despite its slow pace and a cast of characters you might not feel emotionally connected to, this is a novel worth checking out for its amazing world-building and its exploration on what makes up truth in the digital age—unsettlingly, something the world is experiencing right this moment.

Review by Day Moon

Two cousins are leaving the protection of their underground bunker, after a cataclysmic war and unrelenting disease ravaged the earth. On the other side of North America, a young survivalist is leaving the seclusion of his cabin in the woods.

I would highly recommend this gripping post-apocalyptic thriller to anyone who has a thirst for the genre, and to anyone who wants to read an action-packed, thought-provoking book. The first part of the book builds the tension up superbly, like a horror film, tipping you to the edge of your seat, whilst also dipping back into the past to explain what has brought the world to this point. The second half of the story is almost sad in its gory inevitability. Humans have not had enough violence or death, and the war continues. I was fully involved with the characters and rooting for them to come through. Very much looking forward to reading the next installment.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Professor Anna Klein and her husband, Sean, are a young couple each struggling with their own misperceptions of reality. When Bard, a student of Anna’s, develops his own obsession with the couple, their already unsteady world collapses with irrevocable consequences. A Flash of Red ultimately asks the question: What happens when we can no longer tell the difference between what we want and what is real?

A Flash Of Red is an intriguing psychological thriller which introduces some rather unlikable characters. Anna, a psychology lecturer who fears she has inherited her mother’s mental illness, and Sean her scheming husband, who has been rejected sexually by Anna due to their inability to conceive a child. As a result, their marriage is fractured and full of suspicion and manipulation, despite the perfect image they present to the outside world. Bard, a psychology student, feels he has a connection with Anna, and becomes the cataclyst for destruction, as this well plotted and paced novel thunders towards a dramatic climax. As I read this book I kept changing my mind about who was at fault. A very cleverly plotted psychological thriller.

Review by A Flash of Red

Scheduled for Review on April 17, 2017

Lina believes her boss is the knight avatar she adores in her favourite medieval MRPG. Thrilled to be working as a game artist, she has other issues to face: her disapproving mother, her gay friend, religious doubts. Will love save her, or has she fallen for the wrong man?


During a time when there was more change and unrest than any other period in Egyptian history, 12-year-old Ankhesenamun became Queen over the most powerful nation of the ancient world. She was more than just a pharaoh’s wife. When sacrifices had to be made, she gave with everything she had.

For fans of historical fiction, specifically that based on the ancient Egypt civilization, and readers who like stories based on an untold figure in history, this book may just find you delightfully surprised.

Review by The Forgotten: Aten’s Last Queen

Given an impossible choice–kill a stranger to save five other strangers–what would YOU do?

If you like psychological horror and books that make you think as well as scare you, this book is for you. The author is a true professional and this reader can tell that he knows his craft, his pacing and character development. The book never lags. The characters live and breathe and feel very intense emotions that draw you in and make you sympathize. The internal monologue is handled deftly as well, without bogging down the reader in Chris’s agonizing decisions, but giving us enough to allow us to experience this with Chris. It’s a great read and would please anyone who can stomach some violence and uncomfortable situations.

Review by Kill Someone

Second edition of best selling war novel–incorporates veterans’ comments and new historical information. Young man comes of age during bloody combat and aftermath of war. Accurate history, engaging story, the bad and the good, warm and funny.

Public Information was a highly enjoyable, detailed read on the Korean War. It gives the reader a real sense of what it was like in the war with lovable characters to root for and a great feeling of years gone by. History buffs and fans of war fiction will love this novel, but the war scenes are not very graphic and the novel incorporates enough humor to make it accessible for a wider audience. A very solid, albeit long, read.

Review by Public Information

John Fisher, is a Park Police officer. His office is a Dodge Durango. The dark legends and creatures have always been around, and after the civil rights movement they’re legal. When someone breaks the law on Federal land, it ‘s John’s job to bring them in, vampire, were, or other…

One of the most marvelous things about this novel, is how the prose reads like the observations and experiences of a detailed orientated cop without actually feeling that it was written by a cop who writes up so many reports that it’s second nature. I certainly got the feeling who John Fisher was, even if he’s not someone I’d be buddies with. Of course, part of that is I like my were-critters to be sexy. Cool. So, if you are looking for Anita Blake like Weres, John Fisher isn’t one of those.

But what John Fisher is, rough and yet smarter than he’d like you to think, he is in a totally realistic way. The supporting cast carries this verisimilitude across the book with only two clunkers of minor characters. I’m referring to two total twits in suits that remind of cops from an accidentally deadly traffic stop. Yet, in this first person narrative, it is realistic that John holds them in such disdain that they do not actually come across as realistic.

The dialogue is witty when John is not trying to be witty, and often not when he’s trying to be. The other characters often have better dialogue, which is amazing to me.

It’s almost a police procedural, which I enjoy when done correctly (and this was). When a book isn’t going to be a straight procedural, I like to have seen more romance and more introspection. But, true to type as a military man, just kinda says he blows his top and rushes through through the moment until he is out of emotional upheaval. It’s realistic… just not as satisfying as it could be.

I’m interested in reading more in the series. If William Lehman can adjust the mix a little, John Fisher could become quite the popular hero. Or Anti-Hero.

Review by Harvest of Evil

Olivia Davenport makes an impetuous to sneak on a mission with the knights. When her deception is revealed, she is sent home in disgrace. An unexpected turn of events puts her at the center of a dangerous plot against the King, putting both her life and her heart at risk.

With action-packed scenes, a strong (albeit imperfect) female protagonist and set in a well-developed world, this story is for those who want a light and refreshing read about being brave enough not to live up to what others expect you to be and forging your own path. Readers who are looking for an extremely empowering female character, wholly perfect and strong, will not find one here. But if a flawed and relatable teenage protagonist is right up your alley, then this book is for you.

Review by Not Every Girl

A humorous satire on fundamentalism as a pair of gay kissing cousins in Texas rescue their transgender nephew from the hillbillies of Arkansas.

This story has heart but there are some flinch worthy moments in the first fifth of the book. Carl Jr. is hamming it enough to make a drag queen blush and it served more exposition than comedy. The cast of family members that account for Carl’s bitterness and distrust are just too thick with too similar names to take or to fully recall after the failed elopement to Ireland.

And when we do meet the family he distrusts so, they come en masse as a gaggle of clucking hens. By the end of the family gathering, I knew none of them… except that the seed is planted in Carl’s head that some of them aren’t as bad as he maybe thought.

Carl Jr and Bubba Gene bloom once Carl Jr. put aside chasing his glory days and begins investigating and experimenting with the pie recipe. Carl’s business mind is impressive and I enjoyed watching him pursuing all the variables. Bubba Gene has a minor supporting role, guiding Carl with well placed revelations and support. It was not comedy gold, but it was wonderful writing.

Watching Carl Jr. build a support network from scratch for his cousin’s sister and her child, made me believe that Carl Jr was more than the drama queen stereotype he appeared in the first third of the book. It also made believe in J.H. Hayes’s ability to create real people.

This seems more like a lighthearted memoir than the promised humorous satire on fundamentalism. Sure, there’s the obvious Christian hypocrisy you find in the bible belt. That’s funny in the sense that it’s the 21st Century and we still have to deal with this shit. And getting past the middle age hump is always good for a laugh no matter the orientation, but I wanted more.

I wanted a Texan Armistead Maupin, fair of me or not.

If the author returns to these characters, I would like to see more conflict, and not just confrontations like we had at the end of the book. The best parts of this novella was watching Carl Jr rise the challenge he put in front of himself (and I’m not asking for more Viagra moments). Carl figured out the problem, set out to fix things, discovered how to fix things, and threw money in the right direct.

Which, of course, is a perfectly great way to deal with real life problems.

But its not a great way to unfold a story.

The preacher man was never seen. Sherleen’s combative and abusive ex might as well be a ghost. Randi never calls Carl Jr out for using females pronouns on himself, in third person, never using SHE for Randi. Randi stays “nephew” even after Randi comes out to him. Other than a few imperfect pies and four wasted Viagra pills, Carl suffers no setbacks. Sure, the river scene was funny and embarrassing for the “kissing cousins,” but its totally not connected to the plot in any way.

Review by Gravy In The Pie

Can a Latina U.S. President reform a corrupt financial system before the system itself destroys her? “An unusually deep plot for a political thriller…An enthralling protagonist at the heart of a gripping tale. A suspenseful–and topical–tale of White House intrigue.” — Kirkus Reviews

Those who regularly read political thrillers or crime thrillers will enjoy this book.

 

Review by The Latina President

Gary is writing what he is convinced will be a best-selling self-help book, despite his own conspicuous lack of success.

Hilarious in its complete embrace of faith-over-substance approach to success and wealth, Gary’s Guide to Life will have readers cringing and laughing at this witty sendup of the Self-Help aisle. If you’re a fan of Dr. Phil types and take your self-help gurus seriously, you might not appreciate this rollicking satire. For everyone else, you’ll want to step in and give Gary a good shake for being so very blind to what’s blatantly obvious to the reader, but you’ll also root for him to succeed at being successful because he is so endearingly naive.

Review by Lynne Hinkey

The Last Great American Magic reimagines the legend of Tecumseh, a physically gifted warrior, and his twin brother Rattle, a wickedly smart but lazy prophet. Growing up, the boys are rivals, but in adulthood they reconcile to form a confederacy of Native American tribes and fight the advance of settlers.

THE LAST GREAT AMERICAN MAGIC is a worthy read and holds broad appeal for any who enjoy historical or literary fiction, romance and even fantasy. It is a beautifully written, quality novel and worthy of the title TOP PICK.

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

She lost everything. Everything but the memories of a past she refused to let go of. Now it will take a herd of wild horses to drag her back to life where she’ll learn a valuable lesson from a very unlikely hero.

A timely must read by all! Once you open it, you won’t be able to put it down. Heart wrenching and eye opening, it will make you angry and hopeful at the same time.

Review by Anita Lock

The people of LonePine, Wyoming, like most small towns in the American West, know about heartbreak and economic despair. And ever since the undead showed up, they know about terror too. That’s why every pickup radio, every jukebox in every saloon, and every portable radio is belting out classic country.

With a fast pace and a well-developed world of vampire intrigue, THE COWBOY AND THE VAMPIRE is a perfect easy read for lovers of all adventure novels. More than a romance and breaking the stereotypes of both cowboys and vampires, this is a must-read if you enjoy unique fiction and fast-paced plots.

Review by The Cowboy and the Vampire

When the worlds of Johnny and Jamaal collide, the catastrophic clash ignites racial conflict not seen since Ferguson. The incident tests the fledgling love of Johnny’s best friend Lucas and his African-American girlfriend Chantal, setting them on a quest for truth and justice in the perverse racial landscape of 2016.

A disturbing yet highly recommended must-read, especially during current troubling times.

Review by Anita Lock

The 1950s. In a small Tennessee town Jamie Logan stars in his high school’s musical and begins a journey that could take him to the pinnacle of the opera world. Jamie has a voice beautiful beyond belief. His desire to sing becomes his reason for being. Will that be enough?

You Are My Song creates a nice closure to a great trilogy! There is no doubt that the largest draw of readers will come from those who are musically inclined—whether instrumentalists or listeners. Yet Jordan incorporates so much more than the opera scene to grab the attention of anyone looking for a captivating read.

Review by Anita Lock

Robert has Asperger’s Syndrome and endures a myriad of awkward moments in his quest to meet a nice, normal girl.

Stim was a delightful, insightful, and often funny read that pulls at the reader’s heart. It will appeal to those interested in Asperger’s Syndrome and those just wanting to understand the myriad of challenges and unique experiences associated with being different. Highly recommended!

Review by Stim

She wants love, he wants the gold medal. The lines between love and obsession are blurred in this blend of dark romance and psychological thriller that combines the heat of Fifty Shades of Grey, the twists of Gone Girl, and the warped reality of Black Swan.

Rising romance author Lauren Rico spins a gripping tale of loss, love, and lies in book one of the Reverie series. A true storyteller, Rico grabs the attention of her audience from the get-go. Twisty and tantalizing, Reverie is bound to be a favorite among romance buffs with a love for classical music.

Review by Reverie

All Jane Seymour wants is a husband; but when she catches the eye of a volatile king, she is pulled deep into the Tudor court’s realm of plot and intrigue….

Well executed and thoroughly researched, Jane the Quene is for romance lovers and history buffs alike. One part romantic drama and two parts historic fiction, Jane the Quene follows innocent Jane Seymour as she goes from the plain girl who keeps her head down to the center of of attention and power. Janet Wertman delivers pages of beautiful prose in a well-researched first book. And it doesn’t stop here! Readers can expect to gobble up more courtly intrigue as the saga continues.

Review by Jane the Quene

Scheduled for Review on April 17, 2017

Don’t stand out. Blend in. Remain invisible. These are the rules for survival in Wynter Reeves’ world. But when circumstances beyond her control put her in the spotlight, her worst nightmare becomes reality.


When humanity can only reproduce via IVF, who really controls the future?

This book will appeal to anyone who enjoys a dystopian style adventure. It has plenty of action, thrills and plot twists to keep a fan of most genres on their toes. The characters are interesting and believable, and the story is well written and paced. Towards the end, the action intensifies, with several disturbing plot twists meaning I was very reluctant to put the book down.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

An overwhelming conspiracy – an underwhelming hero. Max Bowman, aging ex-CIA desk jockey, may be lacking in secret agent skills, but he’s positively brimming with bad luck as he accidentally steps into a massive military conspiracy centering around a missing war hero who just happens to be the son of a celebrity general. Now he’s on a road trip into the heart of America’s darkness – where he has to confront some ugly truths about the country – and himself.

Dark Sky is a fast paced and action packed detective style thriller. It keeps your interest in both the plot and in the characters. As well as the physical journey to the mysterious Dark Sky complex, there is the inner journey both Max and Jeremy undertake; the examining and letting go of the past and the attempt to make amends with estranged family members. Max Bowman is a great and believable character and once you’ve got to know him, you will be grateful there are further adventures to come in the series. An enjoyable adventure for fans of action, adventure and detective stories.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

A bounty hunter and a military officer must form an unstable alliance under the looming threat of galactic war.

Perfect for science fiction fans, especially those looking to dive into a new series. Both Lissa and Lance are compelling characters, and it is worth taking the time to get to know them. A great book.

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

Nichole is struggling to deal with keeping her family together and taking care of her young siblings. Richard is trying to decide what is important in his life after making many mistakes. Can they overcome and get a second chance?

This book is a good read, and anyone who enjoys a contemporary storyline with modern issues, such as prejudice, addiction and social inequality will enjoy the themes and ideas examined here. It is also driven nicely by the well rounded characters.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

On a back alley in Toronto’s Kensington Market, above the Heaven & Earth Bakery, there’s an apartment with a room for rent. The rent is negotiable. The location varies. Humans need not apply.

The Tenants of 7C is a unique paranormal plot that includes a cast of human-like mythical creatures. While Degan’s often-humorous scenes are rather refreshing, aficionados of this genre may find themselves frustrated with her weak character development.

Review by Anita Lock

Help isn’t always the easiest thing to give, and it can be even more difficult to accept…

Cole’s human-interest story is definitely not a light read. Focusing on one man’s dysfunctional life and family, Cole’s plot presents life in the raw. Weaving in constant tension resulting from a lifetime of strife, readers may capture an overriding dystopian ambiance to Cole’s plot—and rightfully so since aging has its difficulties. Although well written and highly thought provoking, Ripples Through Time will not appeal to all, especially those who are faint of heart.

Review by Anita Lock

It’s 1854 in the American West and Didier Rain – rogue, poet, and would-be entrepreneur – is hired by The Church of the Restructured Truth to deliver a child-bride to the sect’s prophet across a frontier fraught with perils, comedy, and carnal temptations.

Kindall pulls out all the terminology stops in his latest read. Although a fascinating read laced with allegory and human interest, Delivering Virtue’s highest appeal will be toward seasoned readers, especially English literature aficionados. Others may enjoy the tongue-in-cheek comments, but miss nuances of European literary legends.

Review by Anita Lock

Rhidauna by Paul E. Horsman is a compelling and fast paced fantasy story that takes you on a thrilling, action packed horseback adventure across a country filled with powerful magic, greed and treachery.

For lovers of epic fantasy and sword and sorcery, Rhidauna is an enjoyable read with great world building and lots of adventure reminiscent of the Belgariad by David Eddings. Well-written and plotted, it delivers what readers of the genre would expect and keeps the reader turning the pages. For lovers of epic epic fantasy, Rhidauna might be a bit short, but overall a very good start to a series. Recommended.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

Blue Sun, Yellow Sky is about a painter who learns she’s going blind. Faced with this crushing diagnosis, Aubrey Johnson travels the world in search of art, and ultimately finds herself.

Blue Sun, Yellow Sky is for readers who are moved by the power of the human spirit under difficult circumstances, and those who wish to intimately experience one character’s journey of discovery. It is for readers who appreciate depth, quality writing and detailed descriptions that make you feel like you are really there.

Review by Candi Sary

DEVELOPING MINDS: AN AMERICAN GHOST STORY follows a group of recent college graduates who struggle with feelings of alienation and their addictions as they try to survive a year of teaching at two dysfunctional Miami public schools.

Anyone who enjoys realistic fiction, with a gritty edge will enjoy this novel. The characters are extremely well written and believable, and the dialogue is perfect. Despite the serious matter, the book is also very humorous, visual and vibrant to read.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Can love sustain light when the forces of evil close in? Paris, 1939-1942. A fallen angel is trapped in the web of German occupation. The deadly noose of Nazi control grows ever tighter, ensnaring her and two of her lovers.

The book is beautifully written. The history is magnificent, and if you want to learn about occupied Paris from the perspective of persecuted Jewish families and Resistance fighters, this book is a fun way to do so. 

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

Stumpy McCabe is forced back into the deceitful world of prize fighting to save his family and to chase away the nightmare that has tormented him for decades. Navigate through Trenton, NJ’s crime-infested backstreets and alleys with Stumpy as he obsessively defends the integrity and honor of his legacy.

With Strings Attached is for readers interested in a crime novel with likable characters, vivid descriptions and a close look at the underworld. Though a bit slow-paced with its detailed writing, there are still plenty of reasons to enjoy this street-smart, Jersey novel.

Review by Candi Sary

Strikingly relevant, brutally honest, politically incorrect look at 12-year old Glen Feigman’s experience with integration in 1970. Events at school lead to a violent shaking of his liberal Jewish suburban family’s foundations. Adding to Glen’s misery, he fears he is gay. Poignant yet often funny, and definitely thought-provoking.

Glen Shuld offers readers plenty of food for thought in his fictional memoir. Shuld incorporates topics on racism, inequality, minority issues and gender. Baby boomers will especially relate to the nuances he describes of the 1960s and 1970s. The Color of Character comes highly recommend—indeed, a wonderful and riveting read!

Review by The Color of Character

Grover Cleveland College is dying, and the shock is too much for the founder/president, Cyrus Cleveland – a descendant of President Grover Cleveland. In a last bid to save his beloved institution, he wills the college to his nephew Marcus, a used car salesman who has never been to college.

Well-written, Long Live Grover Cleveland is an entertaining look at academic life, filled with both subtle and laugh out loud observations on the egos and insecurities that fuel it. A formatting issue in the electronic version results in numerous, random line breaks that interrupt the reading flow, but the meticulous editing of the narration, and the fun story with a feel-good ending more than make up for the inconvenience. An enjoyable read, definitely worth it, particularly for anyone who has experienced college-life in any form.

Review by Lynne Hinkey

Following a series of bad judgements, Nicolas Keszthelyi finds himself alone and pursued by the police in the depths of the French countryside. In a final attempt to secure his freedom, he writes to the police and lays out his side of the story…

People Like Us is an intelligent (in some places brilliant), well-written and entertaining novel. It reads like a cold white wine, not sweet but dry enough to make you pucker your lips in anticipation of the next sip. Perhaps it might go well with courgettes.

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

n the 1950s, a brilliant young pianist with a defective heart meets the love of his life and strives for success in the daunting world of classical music. ELI’S HEART is more than a compelling love story – it is filled with music, courage and hope.

Fans of Nicholas Spark novels looking for similar romance themes will be pleasantly surprised with Jordan’s latest novel. One does not need to be a connoisseur or aficionado of classical music to appreciate the depth of relationship between Eli and Krissy. On the plus side, for those who are way into this musical genre, Jordan includes and rich list of suggested recording discussed in Eli’s Heart, as well as specific recordings by Samuel Sanders. Undoubtedly, a great read that comes highly recommended.

Review by Anita Lock