Plot

Karen McCorkal loses her job at megacorporation/sovereign nation Westmore Industries, replaced by software she designed. So she vows to destroy the company and country of Westmore alike. As one does.

Westmore and More! is an entertaining and ambitious story with plenty of dark humor. The satire bites hard and deep with some sadly accurate truths about human nature. The story could benefit from some serious editing, both copy editing for the numerous typos and to improve the uneven pacing and overall length. It’s worth a look for the creative story, especially for those who enjoy humorous sci-fi satire.

Review by Westmore and More!

Lia Davies is a small town business owner sleepwalking through life until she enters the world of the Paldimori. Chaos is the powerful leader of his people who prides himself on his control. They collide at every turn, but will Lia live long enough to explore the passion they ignite?

Readers who enjoy a well-crafted story with fantasy and supernatural elements with lots of intrigue and humor will enjoy the story in Waking Chaos. But, beware: the terribly cheesy sex scenes will either make you throw up in your mouth a little bit or laugh out loud. Five stars for the well-written intrigue, action, and plot but -1 for the cheesy sex scenes that strip any hint of romance or eroticism from the story for a total of 4 stars.

Review by Waking Chaos

Lawyers arguing a case on opposite sides disagree on most everything, except the love they both feel for their dogs, a Boston terrier and a Jack Russell terrier. Loneliness and their dogs bring them together in a surprising way on Valentine’s Day.

Love on Trial is a quick light and sweet read about two lawyers and their pups who happen to fall in love.

A recommended read for those who enjoy light, contemporary, and clean romance about puppy love, swallowing your pride and following your pups first love.

Review by Love on Trial

Two comedians go to war over a stolen joke premise.

This “tale of friendship and its discontents” (as the author puts it) may not be for everyone. Fans of comedy, and those that enjoy stories of how relationships can be so strong and so fragile at the same time will enjoy it. At times it was confusing as to which characters were talking or doing the action, but this book has great qualities in the way of plot development and characterization that really hit it out of the park.

Review by Wrecking Balls

Witches are real, they are evil, and Claudia Matthews must fight her way past the temptation of corruption, and weakness to find the answers she seeks for her saving grace. But being bound to the damned means fighting against more temptation than the pull of power.

Malefica is perfect for fans off Melissa de la Cruz and Richelle Mead. An unpredictable and tightly woven plot, along with original world-building, keep this book moving forward at a fast clip.

Review by Katie Rose Guest Pryal

Thriller novelist Garth Wainwright wakes from a car crash coma suffering from amnesia. Desperate to find his identity he learns he has a wife snatched during the car crash that stole his memories and almost his life —on orders from the head of a crime cartel.

Inside Moves: A Wainwright Mystery was a gripping and poignant read with bad guys, good guys and take-charge women for readers seeking a crime novel with an Ocean’s Eleven sort of feel.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

Scheduled for Review on December 4, 2017

Chloe wants an adventure, but first, it’s bad day after another. She gains two pounds, gets pulled over for littering, forgets the milk twice, and catches her husband cheating. Adventure becomes chaos when Chloe is accused of murder, chased by a hot detective, and tries to avoid Stranger Danger.


Every family has secrets. Some are worth dying for. With twists and turns that will leave your head spinning, this psychological thriller will keep you up past your bedtime.

A shocking story of brutal domestic and child abuse, this is not a story for the faint-hearted. Dark, disturbing, tragic and shocking, the plot weaves the past and present together and offers a grim glimpse into many troubled minds. Genuinely gripping.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Oliver is biding his time in a soul sucking internship when he accidentally becomes a superhero. If he can survive the endless training sessions, the generic but tight suit, and getting thrown through the occasional wall, he might just have time to stop the bad guy from enslaving the world.

Here’s the great thing about SuperGuy… the premise smells like KickAss and the Greatest American Hero combined, but it’s neither. It  comes out as something better.

The slapstick and violence are actually tastefully minimized. The superhero cliches are handled well with perfectly selected, coordinated lampshades. I can’t stress how well the internal logic of the superhero and government relationships are handled, but then all the relationships are handled super well. Every human interaction is funny but without cost to the internal logic of this universe’s rules. You can believe in everyone in this story.

It’s rare for me to find a novel where the humor is handled so deftly and so consistently. It’s a smooth ride of smirks and chuckles and if there’s a flaw in the story, it might be that there are no big superbelly laugh payoffs. But, it’s not really that type of funny.

I like the romance in the story and I like that it’s soft and not a heavy plot point. I like that the girl he is seeing is a better and stronger superhero than he is. I like that he respects her and that he goes to her for help and (most especially) I like that he does it without whining.

I like that all the women in this book are strong; even if that strength might be getting other people to do their work for them. This is important, because this is a part of the present bureaucratic process; it isn’t women being bitchy. It’s just how offices often work. One woman deftly handles realigning responsibilities with  legit advice and ego buffing and we get to see her internal logic. Another woman is treated as an unreachable  goddess, so she selectively uses that to get men to do her bidding (said bidding is restricted to moving plants and office furniture), but we do not get to see her internal thinking. Beside Roger, there are only two efficient productive office staffers, and they are women… one works for the Mayor (Lily) and one reluctantly works for SuperGuy (Emma). They get their share of humor, too, and none of it at the expense of their personhood.

But mostly, I like Gray Matter, the villain, even if he feels, well gray… he’s almost a generic villain, which might be expected in a foil to a generic hero whose symbol is a bar-code and whose most outstanding feature is a randomly too noticeable crotch. I’m hoping that the next villian is much more colorful and outrageous and breaks all the rules that the author expertly set up.

Will there be a sequel? I assume so. It’s one of the rules.

There is always another issue coming out. I look forward to it.

Review by SuperGuy

Two cousins are leaving the protection of their underground bunker, after a cataclysmic war and unrelenting disease ravaged the earth. On the other side of North America, a young survivalist is leaving the seclusion of his cabin in the woods.

I would highly recommend this gripping post-apocalyptic thriller to anyone who has a thirst for the genre, and to anyone who wants to read an action-packed, thought-provoking book. The first part of the book builds the tension up superbly, like a horror film, tipping you to the edge of your seat, whilst also dipping back into the past to explain what has brought the world to this point. The second half of the story is almost sad in its gory inevitability. Humans have not had enough violence or death, and the war continues. I was fully involved with the characters and rooting for them to come through. Very much looking forward to reading the next installment.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

It’s impossible but it’s on-screen. He’s captured—on camera—the scene of his own death. He has only two options: succumb to his fate the footage foretells or fight—to the death if need be—for his very own life.

The End is a book you can read in one day, which is exactly what I did. Not just because it is short, but because you simply cannot tear yourself away from it. For me, this book was a little nugget of perfection. Trevor is an ordinary young man, working hard to provide for his pregnant wife. At the weekend though, he tests his mountain biking skills to the maximum, in the mountains of Utah. Back at home, Trevor watches the footage recorded on his Go-Pro camera and is shocked to witness his own death. How his own death could be recorded on the camera, and what this now means for Trevor and his family, provide a nail biting rush to the finish. A thoroughly engaging and vivid read with a spectacular twist. Everything about this book persuaded me to keep reading; the characters, their motives, the beautifully described mountain bike scenes, and the desire to know how Trevor’s death got onto the camera. I highly recommend this accomplished book to anyone who enjoys action and adventure stories, and for anyone looking for a quick, but fully engrossing and satisfying read.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Homicide detectives use an unapproved type of a DNA search in an attempt to catch a serial killer.

A thoroughly researched and genuinely compelling detective drama. The Death of Anyone introduces disgraced detective Bonnie Benham, who is determined to put her addictions behind her in order to solve a new case. A killer is targeting young girls and it’s a race against time to stop him before the body count gets any higher.

Review by The Death of Anyone

A phone call in the small hours after midnight lands Dallas PI Ed Earl Burch in a lethal game where nobody can be trusted and everybody wants him dead. That includes the caller, an old flame with a violent temper and a terminal knack for larceny and betrayal.

The Right Wrong Number is filled with the latest and greatest of Nesbitt’s Quentin-Tarantino wit mixed with everything gory, despicable, irreverent, and plenty of sex. Indeed, a great combination of mystery and a plain laugh-out-loud read—guaranteed to be a favorite for noir enthusiasts.

Review by The Right Wrong Number

The secrets of the past have been unearthed and with them, lives torn apart, exposed, and laid to waste. An ancient bloodline struggles to survive the chaos, violence and warped beliefs fostered over a hundred years.

Highly recommended, energetic and vibrant shape-shifting fantasy series. You will need to have read the first books to get to grips with this one, but this is a series worth diving into. Diego’s pack are forced to deal with evil Senator Flynn in this installment, after kidnapping his daughter Selene in book two. This book is very much Selene’s story, and we learn much more about the shape shifting cats and their Pride and legacy. The book ends on an explosive note, with Regina’s past coming back to haunt her and teasing us into wanting to read Book Four. Anyone who enjoys shape shifters, vampires, and character driven fantasy, will love this steamy series.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Professor Anna Klein and her husband, Sean, are a young couple each struggling with their own misperceptions of reality. When Bard, a student of Anna’s, develops his own obsession with the couple, their already unsteady world collapses with irrevocable consequences. A Flash of Red ultimately asks the question: What happens when we can no longer tell the difference between what we want and what is real?

A Flash Of Red is an intriguing psychological thriller which introduces some rather unlikable characters. Anna, a psychology lecturer who fears she has inherited her mother’s mental illness, and Sean her scheming husband, who has been rejected sexually by Anna due to their inability to conceive a child. As a result, their marriage is fractured and full of suspicion and manipulation, despite the perfect image they present to the outside world. Bard, a psychology student, feels he has a connection with Anna, and becomes the cataclyst for destruction, as this well plotted and paced novel thunders towards a dramatic climax. As I read this book I kept changing my mind about who was at fault. A very cleverly plotted psychological thriller.

Review by A Flash of Red

“this strikes me as a finely crafted story…I rate it as a superior novel and recommend it to anyone who appreciates the challenge of an unflinching mystery. Certainly I was repeatedly surprised.” —Multiple NYT bestseller Piers Anthony

Whether you’re a fan of sci-fi fan, hard-boiled detective stories, or mysteries, this book will appeal to you. Yes, it crosses genre lines, but in such a seamless manner and with such elegant prose, even purists of any one of those genres will be satisfied. But, don’t grab this if you’re looking for a cozy mystery. The violence isn’t gratuitous but some of it is graphic. The superb writing and editing (the few errors stand out because of their paucity), and complex plotting of The Last Detective make it a great read for anyone who enjoys an exciting who-done-it.

Review by The Last Detective

He sees her. Watches her every move and knows beyond a shadow of a doubt that Lady Victoria is his key to salvation; she has no idea what storm is coming her way. I am Ezra Stone, and I always get what I want.

Adventures ensue, and world building happens, and there are demons and other interesting things. All of this would have been fine, but for a need for editing and a troubling relationship between the main characters.

Review by Dark Sonata

Nick Sibelius wants peace and the love of good woman. Failed dentist, Barry Swenson, wants to make a killing in meth and toxic waste. Caught in a death spiral of toxic relationships, Nick must choose between love and justice. And get kill’t dead–or worse.

“Kill’t Dead or Worse” is a smart novel chocked full of great characters and light humor. Finding humor and action surrounding Texas culture and a toxic waste dump, “Kill’t Dead or Worse” is anything but toxic.

Review by KILL’T DEAD OR WORSE

Given an impossible choice–kill a stranger to save five other strangers–what would YOU do?

If you like psychological horror and books that make you think as well as scare you, this book is for you. The author is a true professional and this reader can tell that he knows his craft, his pacing and character development. The book never lags. The characters live and breathe and feel very intense emotions that draw you in and make you sympathize. The internal monologue is handled deftly as well, without bogging down the reader in Chris’s agonizing decisions, but giving us enough to allow us to experience this with Chris. It’s a great read and would please anyone who can stomach some violence and uncomfortable situations.

Review by Kill Someone

Loretta Marion’s debut novel is a twisty page-turner, expertly blending the webs of mystery, danger and suspense with the alluring possibility of romance from a once unrequited love.

“The Fool’s Truth” will appeal to fans of suspenseful thrillers with multiple layered story lines, so long as they are not too discerning when it comes to the nuances of the writing style, the depth of the characterizations, or the contrivances of the plot.

Review by The Fool’s Truth

The very core of the Pack is threatened by Diego’s carefully protected secrets and the past he has tried to forget.

The next instalment in this darkly, enigmatic shape-shifting series, this book picks up six months after Loyalties ended. Everything seems rosy, with Angelina and Cole set to marry alongside Regina and Harry. Events take a dramatic and sinister turn when two of the pack are kidnapped, and Diego and the team have to work out by whom and for what reason. An altogether darker book that the first, Uncivil Wars both unravels the secrets of the past, and potentially blows apart the futures of all involved. A juicy read for anyone who enjoys well-plotted, character driven fantasies.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Top cellist Julia James has begun a whole new life- happily married and expecting her first child. She is finally poised to have the life she’s always dreamed of and she is finally able to put the past behind her. 

 Unfortunately, the past isn’t quite done with Julia yet.


A novel filled with music, hope, romance, and a hidden darkness that could leave you in anticipation of what could happen next.

Those who enjoy romance with a touch of thrilling psychopath tactics from the antagonist, this book could be an excellent read for you. Otherwise, should be avoided by those who enjoy light-hearted romance novels.

Review by Rhapsody

Scheduled for Review on March 27, 2017

John Powers, former autonomous operative for Department of Defense undertook orders to terminate a senator believing that the order came directly from the president himself. Now, in Washington, D.C., the Secretary of Defense and D.I.A. agree to take the necessary steps to tie up any unraveling loose ends.


After receiving a heart transplant from a young murder victim, Mia Germaine is plagued by nightmares. Are they clues to solving a murder case, or grim phantasms leading her further into danger? “A Secondhand Life” weaves a tale of reclaimed dreams as this taut thriller ensnares you.

A compelling thriller with twists and turns, A Secondhand Life explores the theory of ‘organ memory’, when Mia, the recipient of a murder victims’ donated heart, begins to experience memories of the night she was killed. Determined to piece together the clues and the bring the killer to justice, Mia places herself and her loved ones in danger to reach the truth. A great pacy thriller with a genuinely shocking ending.

Review by A Secondhand Life

The ill thought out attempt on Tulee’s life was a mistake, a terrible mistake. There’s an old Biblical verse in Galatians saying “whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap”. That never was more true than during those three months in Tyson County, never.

While holding to a Christian undertone, The Passing of Tulee Main is one story that has the potential of capturing the interest of quite a large audience.

Review by Anita Lock

Aurora, a holiday maker, and David, a globetrotting sushi chef, meet-cute on a skydive, literally falling head over heels for each other. However, after a few days of bliss reality rears its ugly head and they have to part again. Three months later Aurora has rearranged her life to be with David. When she returns to Mallorca their love remains strong. Only, nobody reckoned with the human baggage Aurora unwittingly brings to the island. Two professional hitmen with nothing but murder on their minds. The chase is on

Stanke’s wildly thrilling period piece captures not just the groovy vibe of post-Franco Spain in 1977, but also the feel, the look, the smell, of Mallorca just as tourism was starting to really make inroads into the formerly pristine island.

His unusual and ambitious jumps in point of view wouldn’t have worked in the hands of a less skilled author, but here you’re in good hands. David and Aurora’s whirlwind courtship is over almost before it began, and then, upon her return to him three months later (surprise! With a child in tow) the breathless chase through the pine forests and over the mountains unwinds skillfully. David and his young charge flee for their lives from hit men, and then murderous cops. Then Stanke rewinds and adds another perspective, layering on a new level of understanding for the reader. And again he backs up and goes over the same ground again but in the head of yet another character. By the end, when the whole heart-squeezing narrative has unfolded, the reader knows everything and is satisfied. It’s not an entirely happy ending, you know that going in—but it’s a just one, and a thrill right to the last scene.

I wholeheartedly recommend Falling in Death and Love, for anyone who enjoys and appreciates intricate plotting, who has an affinity for Spain, or who needs a reason to stay up late. Once you start this novel, you won’t want to stop.

Review by Kim Kash

Scheduled for Review on January 30, 2017

There are three people in this affair – and two of them aren’t human… A hidden paranormal London lies beneath our own. Escape into the supernatural world of the Blood Lifers. A rebel, a red-haired devil and a Moon Girl battle to save the world – or tear it apart.


Scheduled for Review on April 3, 2017

When Kai’s telepathy spirals out of control, her husband Oliver brings her to the quiet Wisconsin hometown he abandoned a decade ago, where he must confront the secrets of his past to save their future.


“A woman discovers that she’s the reincarnated spirit of an Inca warrior in this imaginative debut novel . . . An often elegantly crafted story that explores the love between parents and their children and how people come to terms with the loss of loved ones.” –Kirkus Reviews

To Swim Beneath the Earth should delight readers who enjoy literary fiction and appreciate beautiful language. It’s a novel that pulls the reader completely into its world. Those who enjoy mystical fiction will certainly relish Bensman’s inventive plotline, psychic phenomenon and past lives. It may not be a good fit for readers searching exclusively for fast-paced action but will certainly satisfy those who revel in a rich story told with detail and depth.

Review by To Swim Beneath the Earth

She lost everything. Everything but the memories of a past she refused to let go of. Now it will take a herd of wild horses to drag her back to life where she’ll learn a valuable lesson from a very unlikely hero.

A timely must read by all! Once you open it, you won’t be able to put it down. Heart wrenching and eye opening, it will make you angry and hopeful at the same time.

Review by Anita Lock

When the worlds of Johnny and Jamaal collide, the catastrophic clash ignites racial conflict not seen since Ferguson. The incident tests the fledgling love of Johnny’s best friend Lucas and his African-American girlfriend Chantal, setting them on a quest for truth and justice in the perverse racial landscape of 2016.

A disturbing yet highly recommended must-read, especially during current troubling times.

Review by Anita Lock

A quiet little mountain town is hiding a big problem. When the townsfolk of Raven’s Peak start acting crazy, Abigail Dressler is called upon to discover the root of the evil affecting people. She uncovers a demonic threat unlike any she’s ever faced and finds herself in a fight just to stay alive.

A unique twist to the demonic realm, paranormal audiences are certainly in for a treat with this first book in a promising new series.

Review by Anita Lock

A sequence of interconnected novellas of dark, Lovecraftian fantasy. Stories of people who find themselves at the borders of reality and discover heroism – or horror.

Flinging a respectful salute to Lovecraftian lore, the novel carefully recreates the poetry of familiar cosmic horror and secret history, and scatters easter eggs about liberally. But Robert DeFrank is no copy cat, and he overlays his stories on Lovecraft’s cherished backgrounds in his own confident, elegant (and to be honest, much more accessible) way. Here is good horror, written well, and for genre afficiandos that alone should be enough to click the purchase button.

The tales of Star Winds at Dusk are anchored around a respect and dedication to building a solid supernatural mythos, providing the cozy depths to lose oneself in that is so necessary to a good horror tale. Though the book is filled with outlandish beasts and no small amount of the occult, Robert DeFrank pulls off that Lovecraftian trick of presenting the inexplicable with academic credulity, and really pervades the sense that a world of the inexplicable lies close by… for those that know how and where to look.

All this talk of H.P Lovecraft may be off-putting to some, but those of you who don’t know their Shoggoth’s from their elbows won’t feel put out. Star Winds at Dusk isn’t a fan fiction, and at the core of the cosmic musings is a solid thread of story filled with intriguing characters. It’s an original twist on time-tested concepts.

I thoroughly enjoyed Star Winds at Dusk. It was pleasingly intriguing, sometimes disturbing and shot through with a quiet dread and tension you’d expect from a seasoned horror writer.

Review by Steve Wetherell

Although a work of fiction, Agony of Being Me is loosely based on actual events and the traumatic & tragic aftermath experienced by an awkward teenage girl who is forced to mature way before her time. Follow Zoe and Jesse through their erratic journeys, poor choices and triumphs. New Adult.

A gritty and hard-hitting exploration in young adult voice and characterisation. Not for the faint hearted, strong issues are dealt with and experienced from the teenager’s points of view, and the narrative voice is excellent.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Scheduled for Review on December 26, 2016

A preteen discovers she’s a witch when a fight with a school rival turns both magical and nearly fatal.


Abandoned by her parents at age three, and tossed away by the only Pack she has ever known, Regina Capalini has one last chance to impress her new Alpha or be left to fend for herself as a rogue wolf, a sentence that will surely end in death.

Loyalties is a captivating and explosive start to an intriguing shape-shifter series. This first book does a fantastic job of putting everything into place, leaving us thirsty for more. The plot involving shape-shifting humans is complex, but at no point does the writing leave us behind. It twists and turns at a galloping pace, and the characterisation is excellent. However, for readers who are not keen on extended and graphic sex scenes, this may not be the series for you!

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Eleven-year-old twins, Josh and Jenna, are transported into the world of dreams to fulfill an ancient prophecy. They encounter an assortment of bizarre creatures, the strangest of strangers and hair-raising dangers on their quest to find the lost Dreamstone and save the world from an eternity of nightmares.

A fun read for children in the lower age ranges of middle-grade. The scary-silly creatures and imaginative parallel dream and nightmare worlds in The Lost Dreamstone make this an entertaining read for young middle grade readers. Adults who enjoy losing themselves in well-told, complex middle grade and young adult fantasy worlds might find it wanting. It’s most solidly a children’s book.

Review by Lynne Hinkey

Julia MacAllistair, a young singer, had always believed in the power of music. But she never imagined that music could literally take her places–that is until she played the music in the box. Will Julia ever see her home again? Can she return from her Song Journey?

The Song Journey is a beautiful and intriguing story of time travel, love, loss and family, with an invigorating backdrop of social history and music. Singer Julia MacAllistair receives a unique gift from her great-grandmother Etty before she dies. Five sheets of music which are able to transport her back in time. Five adventures await her, where she will meet members of her own family, and face danger in war torn Vietnam, as well as true love in 1940’s New Zealand. A beautifully evocative and visual book about the power of music, with a wonderfully strong narrative voice and characters to remember. Readers who enjoy romance, adventure and historical novels will enjoy this book immensely. 

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Mary Elizabeth Stroll tries to bring closure to her haunted youth where, after accidental overdose, she was thrust into distressing afterlife odyssey. Nine-years gone, her past and present converge during a haunting, day-long interview that morphs into a race with death. In Passing is a dark, suspenseful, yet romantic, paranormal tale.

In Passing is a paranormal love story with hints of darkness. It explores the possibility of an after life and the existence of ‘angels’, or people who are able to stop others before they make dire mistakes. The book is not afraid to take on gritty social issues, such as child abuse, substance abuse and abortion, and does so in a positive manner. Well worth a read for those who enjoy paranormal romance and books with a religious theme.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

David and Matt were content to keep their suspicions about Scott to themselves until a simple trip to the library set them on parallel trajectories where even the most careful plans have unexpected consequences that can rock a community and reverberate long after they’re gone.

A page turning psychological thriller that had me on the edge of my seat. An interesting and debatable subject matter; would you kill a killer before they killed? Something similar to the moral question about whether or not you would go back in time and kill Hitler as a baby. Also a brilliant and convincing portrayal of small town life.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

She wants love, he wants the gold medal. The lines between love and obsession are blurred in this blend of dark romance and psychological thriller that combines the heat of Fifty Shades of Grey, the twists of Gone Girl, and the warped reality of Black Swan.

Rising romance author Lauren Rico spins a gripping tale of loss, love, and lies in book one of the Reverie series. A true storyteller, Rico grabs the attention of her audience from the get-go. Twisty and tantalizing, Reverie is bound to be a favorite among romance buffs with a love for classical music.

Review by Reverie

All Jane Seymour wants is a husband; but when she catches the eye of a volatile king, she is pulled deep into the Tudor court’s realm of plot and intrigue….

Well executed and thoroughly researched, Jane the Quene is for romance lovers and history buffs alike. One part romantic drama and two parts historic fiction, Jane the Quene follows innocent Jane Seymour as she goes from the plain girl who keeps her head down to the center of of attention and power. Janet Wertman delivers pages of beautiful prose in a well-researched first book. And it doesn’t stop here! Readers can expect to gobble up more courtly intrigue as the saga continues.

Review by Jane the Quene

Scheduled for Review on January 30, 2017

Ensign Maya Davis must foil a plan to eradicate a benevolent intelligent race during humankind’s first interstellar mission.


Ed Earl Burch is an ex-Dallas homicide detective tormented by memories of a dead partner and a killer snuffed before Burch could track him down. He’s a burnout, living drink by drink. Then Carla Sue Cantrell points a Colt 1911 at him and says the killer is still alive.

The first book in the Ed Earl Burch series, The Last Second Chance isn’t for everyone. Audiences who get a thrill out of Quentin Tarentino’s flicks will no doubt find Nesbitt’s plot captivating from beginning to end.

Review by Anita Lock

She’s feisty, adventurous, and in trouble. He’s the last person she expects to rescue her. Will she choose to protect her heart or trust the only man who ever rejected her?

If you’re a fan of star-crossed lovers, clean stories, or modern-day romances, this novella will appeal to you. The author takes the reader on a journey detailing what it means to let go of your past in order to forgive yourself and others, as Sammie, the main character, has to do just that. Her romantic interest isn’t left out of the loop as far as needing to grow up a bit and give Sammie a second chance. There were moments, because of Lucas’s stubbornness, that he seemed not quite right for her, and like she should go ahead and move on. But in the end, DRAWN TO YOU delivers a quick, sweet read for those looking for a fun, short, romantic story.

Review by Drawn To You

When Miranda Moon arrives in a magical realm threatened by a villain who has a score to settle with branches of her own family tree, she suspects her wild dreams may not be all fiction. Now she’s faced with a choice that will either save Wunderwood… or doom it forever.

Readers who’ve been looking for a new, magical world to fill the void that’s existed since 2009–will enjoy The Tree of Mindala. While not quite as nuanced and complex as Rowlings’ boy wizard series, the fantastical creatures, magical world, and good vs evil face-off in Jacklee’s first book of this series holds a lot of promise. Although the characters feel a bit two-dimensional here, future books may delve more into their development, showing, rather than telling, their personalities, flaws, and motivations helping to ensure readers commit to seeing their journey through to the outcome of the Wunderwood series.

 

Review by Lynne Hinkey

Scheduled for Review on April 17, 2017

Don’t stand out. Blend in. Remain invisible. These are the rules for survival in Wynter Reeves’ world. But when circumstances beyond her control put her in the spotlight, her worst nightmare becomes reality.


A fast-action crime thriller: Evan Powers has left his dull office job to become the new manager in Nick Grady’s marijuana growing operation … however, Nick’s complex past comes full circle, thrusting Evan in a scramble to decipher the truth behind the enigmatic lives of the people he holds dear.

An expertly plotted and devised crime thriller which keeps you guessing until the end – a great, fast paced read, despite the lack of connection between the reader and the main protagonist who I never really felt I got to know.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Sarah Randolph’s just learned that she’s an extraterrestrial living on earth. She’s about to Shift, but she can’t do it alone. Her transformation will reveal her true nature, but will also expose an assailant with sinister intentions. As time runs out, will Sarah’s unique gifts change her fate?

A competent, well written and interesting alien adventure, with a hint of romance, Red-Line: The Shift holds your interest from start to finish. Who is watching Sarah Randolph and what do they want with her? Why hasn’t she felt like herself lately, or been able to sleep? John Ramsey has the answers, or at least some of them, but can she trust him? The action starts quickly, with Sarah going through the ‘shift’ just moments after being told she is not in fact human. The story then confines us to one house and one group of characters as they aid and protect Sarah through her shift, whilst using their own unique sensitivities to divert and fight danger as it appears. Sarah is a ‘red-line’ Eudoran, possibly the last of her kind and the only hope the gray-line Eudorans have of survival…but there is another force at work, and who they are and why they want to get hold of Sarah will no doubt be revealed in Volume Two.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

“The Shining” meets “House of Leaves.” A horror movie fan discovers a box of pictures buried in his basement that lets him spy on his friends.

Lurk is a fresh and clever horror with a well-written cast of memorable characters. With a measured balance of mystery, suspense and reality bending horror, fans of the genre will find themselves breezing through this book in one or two sittings. It’s a real page turner, relying as much on the psychologically disturbing as its moments of grotesque imagery and supernatural creep.

Certain parts recall a young Stephen King, and the use of an unreliable narrator being influenced by the restless dead may ring familiar to fans of The Shining. However, good horror is often in the telling, and Adam Vine tells a fine tale. His depiction of Drew, from whose perspective the events unfurl, is particularly note worthy. Struggling to find his place, Drew is a study on the social outsider in the millennial age, a young man who tries to find solace in youthful crutches as his friends grow up around him, trapping him in a cycle of bitterness and frustration.

Lurk is at its surface a good horror with some genuinely disturbing scenes. But it is the depth of characterisation that sets it apart from its peers. While the cast at first appear to be typical teenage horror fodder, they each reveal wisdom, cynicism and an almost tragic self-awareness of how little, and how much, their formative years actually matter. Lurk is an exploration of youth, friendship and coming of age, wrapped in an eerie, sometimes brutal, horror story.

 

Review by Steve Wetherell

Welcome to SPERO HEIGHTS… a little town where supernaturals who have lost their bump in the night go to recover. Tucked in the wooded Ozark Mountains, the humans are rarely cause for concern, but the citizens of Spero Heights have enough past to go around.

A strong paranormal page-turner, perfect for a weekend read. The start of a series, but ends without a cliffhanger. Look for more from this author.

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

Fae Cunningham, a young reporter with a history of mental illness, seeks out the charismatic founder of a new political movement. Behind his polished rhetoric lies a sinister social program, an ambitious conspiracy to change everything. More disturbing still, his words sound eerily familiar, as if spoken by an acquaintance.

If you could change people’s minds, would you change the world? If so, how far would you take it? That’s the question at the heart of The New Lease, a global thriller that pits a journalism student against a rising political movement with darkly fascinating philosophies on the future of humanity.

The New Lease does what you’d expect a good thriller to do— it hooks you, reels you in and keeps you turning the pages. However, this novel has little in common with your typical Patterson or Child. In a particularly homogenous genre, The New Lease stands out as something very different. For a start, there’s very little reliance on action and suspense to keep you interested. There’s no cheap tricks to keep the pace flowing. What The New Lease relies on instead is a sumptuous cultural immersion and a highly intriguing concept.

Without giving too much away, John Stryder makes a very convincing case for supernatural ability through tantric practice, and indeed, the first person account of a young man on a spiritual journey is perhaps the strongest and most compelling writing in the book. The central premise, though, that a person who can change minds might start a cascade of unprecedented political change, is what propels the reader to the ending.

There is no real hero or villain in The New Lease, as the conflict instead revolves around a tricky moral question— if the ticking time bomb of over-population is an extreme problem that requires extreme measures, who, if anyone, has the moral authority to tackle it head on? In a world that’s increasingly turning a cynical eye to the fallout of globalism and free market capitalism, a book that questions whether we’re capable of change without compromising our innate values is very much of its time. With a careful sense of moral ambiguity, The New Lease doesn’t bash you over the head with any convenient resolutions, and even the protagonists are left not entirely sure who to root for. 

Philosophical intrigue aside, The New Lease is a solid read with few weaknesses. Those sensitive to such things might pick up on John Stryder’s tendency to front-load exposition and tell rather than show, but honestly these foibles are brushed aside by the force of the plot, which, in a thriller, is always king.

Above all, The New Lease has an ace up its sleeve when put alongside the usual cookie-cutter detective yarns that pad the thriller genre, and that is that The New Lease is inherently interesting. And that alone is worth a reader’s time.

Review by Steve Wetherell

When a powerful healing armband falls into the hands of a teenage girl, she’s thrust into a perilous search for her father, the reasons behind her mother’s mysterious death, and the truth about herself.

Light Runner is for readers who would enjoy following the mysterious and supernatural adventures of a determined teen protagonist. Those who like rooting for an unlikely hero will enjoy Dara’s quest to survive the LA streets on her own. Readers more interested in an exciting plot than character development will more likely find this book entertaining.

Review by Candi Sary

When humanity can only reproduce via IVF, who really controls the future?

This book will appeal to anyone who enjoys a dystopian style adventure. It has plenty of action, thrills and plot twists to keep a fan of most genres on their toes. The characters are interesting and believable, and the story is well written and paced. Towards the end, the action intensifies, with several disturbing plot twists meaning I was very reluctant to put the book down.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

An overwhelming conspiracy – an underwhelming hero. Max Bowman, aging ex-CIA desk jockey, may be lacking in secret agent skills, but he’s positively brimming with bad luck as he accidentally steps into a massive military conspiracy centering around a missing war hero who just happens to be the son of a celebrity general. Now he’s on a road trip into the heart of America’s darkness – where he has to confront some ugly truths about the country – and himself.

Dark Sky is a fast paced and action packed detective style thriller. It keeps your interest in both the plot and in the characters. As well as the physical journey to the mysterious Dark Sky complex, there is the inner journey both Max and Jeremy undertake; the examining and letting go of the past and the attempt to make amends with estranged family members. Max Bowman is a great and believable character and once you’ve got to know him, you will be grateful there are further adventures to come in the series. An enjoyable adventure for fans of action, adventure and detective stories.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Undergrad nursing student Jordan must discover what’s more important: making sure the girl he loves life isn’t wasted, or remembering how to live his. Wait! is a story about acceptance, learning to trust and in turn love while facing life’s unexpected difficulties.

A great read for readers who enjoy New Adult College Romance, and for those who enjoys a bit of drama in the midst of the sweet romances.

Review by Wait!

Nichole is struggling to deal with keeping her family together and taking care of her young siblings. Richard is trying to decide what is important in his life after making many mistakes. Can they overcome and get a second chance?

This book is a good read, and anyone who enjoys a contemporary storyline with modern issues, such as prejudice, addiction and social inequality will enjoy the themes and ideas examined here. It is also driven nicely by the well rounded characters.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

When Hollywood agent Buddy Price dies, he discovers God plans on pulling the plug on everyone if we can’t learn to get along. Buddy convinces God to let him fix things and gets a second chance, but he’s probably the last person we’d want to depend on.

This is a great read for anyone, and especially those who enjoy a great send up of pretty much everything. If you’re serious about your religion, or get offended by cartoon-like characterizations of your deity, you might want to steer clear of this since believers, get the same dose of skepticism and satire as the nonbelievers, and God wanders through the kitchen in a plaid bathrobe.

Review by Lynne Hinkey

Help isn’t always the easiest thing to give, and it can be even more difficult to accept…

Cole’s human-interest story is definitely not a light read. Focusing on one man’s dysfunctional life and family, Cole’s plot presents life in the raw. Weaving in constant tension resulting from a lifetime of strife, readers may capture an overriding dystopian ambiance to Cole’s plot—and rightfully so since aging has its difficulties. Although well written and highly thought provoking, Ripples Through Time will not appeal to all, especially those who are faint of heart.

Review by Anita Lock

It’s 1854 in the American West and Didier Rain – rogue, poet, and would-be entrepreneur – is hired by The Church of the Restructured Truth to deliver a child-bride to the sect’s prophet across a frontier fraught with perils, comedy, and carnal temptations.

Kindall pulls out all the terminology stops in his latest read. Although a fascinating read laced with allegory and human interest, Delivering Virtue’s highest appeal will be toward seasoned readers, especially English literature aficionados. Others may enjoy the tongue-in-cheek comments, but miss nuances of European literary legends.

Review by Anita Lock

What if humanity’s greatest talents were concentrated into the hands of a lucky few? More specifically, in only sixteen people? Some would seek to serve themselves. Others would seek the help the world. And others still, to rule it.

Maybe you decide to dig into THE SIXTEEN BURDENS  because its (awesome) cover catches your eye. Or it might be the awards and slew of 5-star reviews that lure you in.  Either way, you’ll only need to read a few paragraphs to know your instinct was spot on. David Khalaf’s debut novel and the first book in THE BURDENS TRILOGY is an eclectic literary mashup — mystery mixed into urban fantasy with a backbeat of Hollywood’s Golden Age. While connecting the dots would be a tall order for a less talented raconteur, Khalaf delivers an engaging adventure grounded in the wondrous complexities of self-discovery and the power of friendship. Bonus: Francesca Baerald’s stellar illustrations.

Review by Yvonne Lieblein

Vincent with sadistic right hand man Frankie, seeks to expand his interests with his own brand of gangland psycho terrorism. Music obsessed James leaves school determined to do life his way, dreaming of glory in a gang with guitars. As two worlds collide, will dreams become nightmares?

This book will appeal to readers who enjoy gangsters and crime thrillers, as well as dark humor. It does, however, have a lot more to offer than that. There are unique and believable characters, and two intriguing story lines which keep you hooked and guessing as to when they are going to tangle. Anyone who enjoys coming-of-age style stories would also enjoy this book, not to mention anyone who thinks of themselves as a music fan. Also for fans of very British books/films. It is described as Goodfellas meets The Commitments, but felt more like Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels meets The Commitments.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

James Weems can eavesdrop on the chit-chat of germs. Within these invaders lie the secrets of every living thing. James could end disease’s reign over mankind. Others also possess this gift, and tampering with its works will incur their wrath. And tampering is precisely what James intends to do.

Ezembe has unique story concept with a lot of potential. Those who enjoy medical science-fiction and don’t mind a touch of the supernatural will find it interesting. The story is intriguing enough to keep the reader turning pages, but the ending doesn’t quite live up to the promise, more due to the flat characters than the plot.

 

Review by Lynne Hinkey

Killing isn’t exactly on Rosalie Lockwood’s list of things to do when she runs away from home. But guns and motorcycles become her latest fashion accessories as she falls for Steele, co-leader of the Fallen Paladins motorcycle club. Enter the unique world of good vs. evil in The Devil’s Flower.

A fast-paced book that will appeal to paranormal and motorcycle fans.

Review by The Devil’s Flower

The US government is in the throes of cyberwarfare with China. Luke Raven, a high-tech billionaire, is the only man that can save America from the deadly fallout. JET an ex-Mossad agent joins the Raven Group. Will they get there soon enough to secure the information from their enemies?

Jet: Exposed was a short and fun read. It will appeal to dedicated readers of thrillers, and particularly to fans of Russell Blake’s Jet and international crime. Raven’s Group is a likable and sexy team and their romp through the world of international crime was an enjoyable escape.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

Ezekiel Clemens is a famed evangelist who harbors a deadly secret. On the day of one of his largest televised meetings, he encounters a stranger that rattles his life and sends him on a journey of repentance where dark secrets are revealed, faith is tested, and lives are forever altered.

The appeal of Between Lions and Lambs is in the flawed and very believable characters and the tragic tale of the making–and breaking–of evangelical preacher Ezekiel Clemens. The multitude of basic English-usage and writing errors, however, leaves the reader feeling somewhat abused by the author. He clearly cared more about publishing than writing, or its essential partner, editing. Readers who don’t mind reading something closer to a first draft than a publication ready story might enjoy this, but don’t expect any polish in the story’s telling. It’s not there. Four stars for an intriguing plot and interesting characters, but one star for the poor quality of the writing, averaging out to 2.5.

 

Review by Between Lions and Lambs

Margaret May Reis knows how strange she is; people have been telling her for years. At sixteen years old, though, Maggie begins to realize that strangeness is only half the story. Maggie isn’t just strange – she’s a witch.

The Witches of Armour Hill: Switch was a good YA read. It had lots of darkness, action, and coming of age angst and explores the challenges of being alone in the world with an edgy heroine who will likely appeal to teens. It offers great new world of witches that will likely only get better with additional books.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

Grover Cleveland College is dying, and the shock is too much for the founder/president, Cyrus Cleveland – a descendant of President Grover Cleveland. In a last bid to save his beloved institution, he wills the college to his nephew Marcus, a used car salesman who has never been to college.

Well-written, Long Live Grover Cleveland is an entertaining look at academic life, filled with both subtle and laugh out loud observations on the egos and insecurities that fuel it. A formatting issue in the electronic version results in numerous, random line breaks that interrupt the reading flow, but the meticulous editing of the narration, and the fun story with a feel-good ending more than make up for the inconvenience. An enjoyable read, definitely worth it, particularly for anyone who has experienced college-life in any form.

Review by Lynne Hinkey

When a mysterious figure is spotted dancing in an empty field, two children investigate. They’ll be led to a place far beyond their imagination, the cloud home of OLGA. Magic weapons, white tigers, cat-faced moths and giants on motorcycles… Ted Kelsey’s quirky children’s novel features illustrations by Dillon Samuelson.

Olga will enchant readers young and old. At times reminiscent of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and at others of Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass, fans of fantasy and adventure will find both excitement and comfort in the novel’s pages.

Review by Genevieve Shifke Ali

Join Stanza on a tornadic quest into regional folklore, a string of historical murders, and the occult – and ultimately, into the mysteries behind her own bloody heritage and fey destiny. Between the suspense and the quality of writing, you won’t be able to leave aside this spellbinding first novel.

Ligatures is for readers who appreciate beautiful language and enjoy a story that both entertains and stimulates thought. It is on the dark side, and is not a simple “feel good” read. Instead, it is a novel with depth and complexity and power. Sara Rich is absolutely an author to watch.

Review by Ligatures