Unique Style

A science fiction noir that wraps the razor wit of Raymond Chandler around the extraordinary vision of Philip K Dick – Nineveh Editions.

This is a dystopian thriller about the power of words and the worlds they can create. While a company has found a way to reduce formulaic text into a power source, the laws have evolved to ensure that anyone who harbors old literature or creates new material is put down. Non-conformity is a risk, and asking questions may cost you your life, as Billy Stringer learns. The story moves at a blistering pace and provides many surprising twists along the way, as well as some delicious prose of its own. Captivating and timely, with a perfect bittersweet ending.

Review by Sandra Ruttan

When an act of mischief goes terribly wrong, Sky is thrown from the Island into a strange and terrifying new world. Hunted for reasons she doesn’t understand, she is forced to use every bit of her wit and cunning to survive. But will it be enough as her murderous pursuers close in?

Those who like fantasies full of unusual creatures and heroes who must grow up in order to face their challenges, will enjoy this middle-grade novel. The main conflict of the story does not start until a few chapters in. The author has a way of starting a scene with a new place and new characters and then backtracking to fill in who the characters are and where they are, which some may find a bit confusing. However, the reader will soon understand what is happening and will be able to jump right back into Sky’s adventure.

Review by Melody Delgado

Neva finds herself swept into a world of vampires where she learns she will determine their future, but she must decide which path she will take while trying to protect the family she left behind, and discovering a past she cannot escape.


The Book of Ralph is an uncanny adventure that uses humor, philosophy, and an alien invasion to explore the down to Earth concept of humility.

The Book of Ralph is an exceptionally humorous and thought-provoking novel, and its blurb certainly delivered and more. Its comedic elements are wonderfully unexpected, much like the crimson message that geared this whole story to start.

Review by Kate Ashley

Excerpt: Cousin Alex sits looking at me and then around at the loft and back to the view offered by my wall of glass, like he’s making a mental calculation of the cost of my lifestyle. The rather large sofa that he’s sitting on is dwarfed by the 15 ft. ceilings and more than ample square footage of the open floor plan. Soft, soothing earth tones are the color palate for my walls, pillows and throws, offset by the large, woolen antique Oriental rug in opulent blues, reds, and greens over my dark, bamboo floors. I see him eye my wildly colorful and quite costly Chihuly hand-blown glass bowl, the perfect complement to the glass coffee table designed by Piero Lissoni, where it is placed for optimum enjoyment. While he studies the surroundings, I study him boldly in the silence before Margaret comes in with the drinks. He wasn’t much of a talker and I wasn’t feeling like making small talk myself, which afforded me the opportunity to continue observing him quite intensely until I knew why he seemed familiar. Stonily observing every detail of his face, it suddenly became clear to me in a rush, that Alex was actually someone I knew very well. It was so startling that I almost gasped audibly at the shock when I realized he was a character from one of my books sprung to life. Not in name, of course, but in every other way. A dark-haired, blue-eyed handsome lad that is the consistent image in my mind when I write the villain or the love interest. With his chiseled features, thick black hair, lightly tanned skin, sexy stubble of facial hair, Alex is the manifestation of the exact words used to describe the good guy in my debut. And he is right here in this room. Right here in the flesh. Alive. Sitting on my sofa. I know that description is not like looking at a photo and readers can come up with their own mental image. But here’s the thing, his face, Alex’s face is what I saw in my mind when I wrote his character, Rick, in Foregone. The first romantic hero that I pictured and the basic model for all the others that came later. His exact face. A knot forms in my stomach. How does one deal with absurdity?

WHEN A STRANGER COMES has an interesting take on the “deal with the Devil” plotline. There are few extremely  gripping moments but a lot of what happened in between was as muddled as its protagonist’s history.

Review by When a Stranger Comes…

Scheduled for Review on August 27, 2018

Alison Hayes needs to find a path. The chaos that has been her childhood is about to explode and she has to find a way not to repeat the mistakes her mother has made. There has to be a better way to live.


Thriller novelist Garth Wainwright wakes from a car crash coma suffering from amnesia. Desperate to find his identity he learns he has a wife snatched during the car crash that stole his memories and almost his life —on orders from the head of a crime cartel.

Inside Moves: A Wainwright Mystery was a gripping and poignant read with bad guys, good guys and take-charge women for readers seeking a crime novel with an Ocean’s Eleven sort of feel.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

It’s the first book in a young adult series, Song for You, called “A Fateful Melody”. It is a fictional memoir of Christie Kelly, someone who is not highly thought of in the media due to her relationship with the ever-popular lead singer and guitarist of rock band Prey for Chance. This completed three-book series tells Christie’s side of the story and you’ll end up rooting for her every step of the way.

This book is recommended for fans of dramatic teen romance. While there is some strong language, there is minimal violence or sexual material. So it is recommended for fans of melodrama and stories about rock bands. However, it is not recommended for anybody looking for more explicit romance fiction or anyone who dislikes reading about the lives of teenagers.

Review by A Fateful Melody

A phone call in the small hours after midnight lands Dallas PI Ed Earl Burch in a lethal game where nobody can be trusted and everybody wants him dead. That includes the caller, an old flame with a violent temper and a terminal knack for larceny and betrayal.

The Right Wrong Number is filled with the latest and greatest of Nesbitt’s Quentin-Tarantino wit mixed with everything gory, despicable, irreverent, and plenty of sex. Indeed, a great combination of mystery and a plain laugh-out-loud read—guaranteed to be a favorite for noir enthusiasts.

Review by The Right Wrong Number

Professor Anna Klein and her husband, Sean, are a young couple each struggling with their own misperceptions of reality. When Bard, a student of Anna’s, develops his own obsession with the couple, their already unsteady world collapses with irrevocable consequences. A Flash of Red ultimately asks the question: What happens when we can no longer tell the difference between what we want and what is real?

A Flash Of Red is an intriguing psychological thriller which introduces some rather unlikable characters. Anna, a psychology lecturer who fears she has inherited her mother’s mental illness, and Sean her scheming husband, who has been rejected sexually by Anna due to their inability to conceive a child. As a result, their marriage is fractured and full of suspicion and manipulation, despite the perfect image they present to the outside world. Bard, a psychology student, feels he has a connection with Anna, and becomes the cataclyst for destruction, as this well plotted and paced novel thunders towards a dramatic climax. As I read this book I kept changing my mind about who was at fault. A very cleverly plotted psychological thriller.

Review by A Flash of Red

Scheduled for Review on April 17, 2017

Lina believes her boss is the knight avatar she adores in her favourite medieval MRPG. Thrilled to be working as a game artist, she has other issues to face: her disapproving mother, her gay friend, religious doubts. Will love save her, or has she fallen for the wrong man?


Marie Bellehumeur, a 52-year-old, chain-smoking French Canadian, accidentally lands the mother of all babysitting jobs … as the prime minister’s nanny!

People who enjoy tongue in cheek political satires will enjoy this book. There were many humorous  moments as well as a few gags that didn’t quite work. However, Marie is a likable character and Josie, The Prime Minister’s wife, not so much, which works for the story. Most of the story is well told, especially at the beginning. However, there were a few sections where one of the characters would be telling a story to the other characters, and the story they were telling went on for way too long. These parts could have used some editing to cut out the unnecessary information. There were also some parts and some minor characters that were a bit confusing to follow as the story went on. But all in all, a worthwhile endeavor for those who want a good laugh and not necessarily a thought provoking read.

Review by Melody Delgado

Aurora, a holiday maker, and David, a globetrotting sushi chef, meet-cute on a skydive, literally falling head over heels for each other. However, after a few days of bliss reality rears its ugly head and they have to part again. Three months later Aurora has rearranged her life to be with David. When she returns to Mallorca their love remains strong. Only, nobody reckoned with the human baggage Aurora unwittingly brings to the island. Two professional hitmen with nothing but murder on their minds. The chase is on

Stanke’s wildly thrilling period piece captures not just the groovy vibe of post-Franco Spain in 1977, but also the feel, the look, the smell, of Mallorca just as tourism was starting to really make inroads into the formerly pristine island.

His unusual and ambitious jumps in point of view wouldn’t have worked in the hands of a less skilled author, but here you’re in good hands. David and Aurora’s whirlwind courtship is over almost before it began, and then, upon her return to him three months later (surprise! With a child in tow) the breathless chase through the pine forests and over the mountains unwinds skillfully. David and his young charge flee for their lives from hit men, and then murderous cops. Then Stanke rewinds and adds another perspective, layering on a new level of understanding for the reader. And again he backs up and goes over the same ground again but in the head of yet another character. By the end, when the whole heart-squeezing narrative has unfolded, the reader knows everything and is satisfied. It’s not an entirely happy ending, you know that going in—but it’s a just one, and a thrill right to the last scene.

I wholeheartedly recommend Falling in Death and Love, for anyone who enjoys and appreciates intricate plotting, who has an affinity for Spain, or who needs a reason to stay up late. Once you start this novel, you won’t want to stop.

Review by Kim Kash

There are three people in this affair – and two of them aren’t human… A hidden paranormal London lies beneath our own. Escape into the supernatural world of the Blood Lifers. A rebel, a red-haired devil and a Moon Girl battle to save the world – or tear it apart.

A unique book told from the point of view of a vampire addressing his dying wife, whilst looking back on the drama they’ve left behind. Quirky, amusing, frightening and dark, Rebel Vampires, Volume One offers a brilliant story, with plenty of twists and turns, romance and gore. For anyone who already enjoys vampire or supernatural horror style stories or for anyone who is just looking for something a bit different, a bit edgy, something that will amuse you, frighten you and take you on one hell of a journey into love, death, humanity, and monsters, then I highly recommend this book.

Review by Chantelle Atkins

Scheduled for Review on March 6, 2017

Pointillistic microfictions composed only of things, describing the breadth and sorrow of existence.


100 by 100 is a collection of 100 stories that are each 100 words long. Mathematically, that makes each worth 1/10 of a picture. Some of these 0.1 pictures are scary, some are funny, some are funny and scary, while others are just odd.

This book is recommended for fans of horror and speculative fiction. It is especially good for those who like short stories and flash fiction. However, due to the brevity of the stories, it is not recommended for readers who are looking for an in-depth story.

Review by Amanda McSweeney

Scheduled for Review on March 6, 2017

When Gabrielle is invited to her thirty-year high school reunion, she’s confronted with the demons who followed her out of the 70s, when she was Gabbie, Geek Goddess, hoi polloi to The Beautiful Ones. Those demons, though, didn’t turn out to be whom she thought they were. mm. Funny, that…


These stories are about the cliff—the tipping point—the instant we must roll the dice or succumb to the status quo. Burch’s characters face life with courage and humor in a tenacious search for meaning and fulfillment.

A Book of Revelations delivers the voyeuristic aspects of social media sans FOMO (fear of missing out) thanks to Burch’s stellar ability to place a reader inside the characters he’s created. His short stories have an epic feel because of his exquisite use of language and penchant for deftly wielding details. (Prepare to be compelled to reread  details like “her right blinking flashing as she turned left” multiple times.)

Lately, there’s been no shortage of research on the benefits of reading floating around in the “soundbite-osphere,” everything from reduced stress levels and higher happiness quotients to better sleep and elevated empathy. (This inc.com feature rounds up nine of them.) As for the latter, being immersed in the worlds masterfully created by Burch may result in an almost immediate boost in understanding.

The eavesdropping sensation they induce is mesmerizing, and the stream of unexpected revelations are, too.

 

LINK FOR ARTICLE ABOVEL  http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/9-ways-reading-fiction-can-make-you-happier-and-more-creative.html

 

Review by Yvonne Lieblein

Scheduled for Review on April 3, 2017

When Kai’s telepathy spirals out of control, her husband Oliver brings her to the quiet Wisconsin hometown he abandoned a decade ago, where he must confront the secrets of his past to save their future.


She lost everything. Everything but the memories of a past she refused to let go of. Now it will take a herd of wild horses to drag her back to life where she’ll learn a valuable lesson from a very unlikely hero.

A timely must read by all! Once you open it, you won’t be able to put it down. Heart wrenching and eye opening, it will make you angry and hopeful at the same time.

Review by Anita Lock

The people of LonePine, Wyoming, like most small towns in the American West, know about heartbreak and economic despair. And ever since the undead showed up, they know about terror too. That’s why every pickup radio, every jukebox in every saloon, and every portable radio is belting out classic country.

With a fast pace and a well-developed world of vampire intrigue, THE COWBOY AND THE VAMPIRE is a perfect easy read for lovers of all adventure novels. More than a romance and breaking the stereotypes of both cowboys and vampires, this is a must-read if you enjoy unique fiction and fast-paced plots.

Review by The Cowboy and the Vampire

A quiet little mountain town is hiding a big problem. When the townsfolk of Raven’s Peak start acting crazy, Abigail Dressler is called upon to discover the root of the evil affecting people. She uncovers a demonic threat unlike any she’s ever faced and finds herself in a fight just to stay alive.

A unique twist to the demonic realm, paranormal audiences are certainly in for a treat with this first book in a promising new series.

Review by Anita Lock

Robert has Asperger’s Syndrome and endures a myriad of awkward moments in his quest to meet a nice, normal girl.

Stim was a delightful, insightful, and often funny read that pulls at the reader’s heart. It will appeal to those interested in Asperger’s Syndrome and those just wanting to understand the myriad of challenges and unique experiences associated with being different. Highly recommended!

Review by Stim

Alien conflict abounds in a page-turning adventure.

Although H.A.L.F.: The Makers is intended for teen and young adults, Wright incorporates a flavor of Star Trek and Twilight Zone episodes into her writing style, which makes it very appealing for older readers as well.

Review by Anita Lock

The same rare brain cancer that nearly killed Tarpon Springs celebrity-in-residence Jonathan Christakos years ago is back to finish the job now that he’s on the wrong side of 40. How Jon navigates his last six months is anyone’s guess, but everyone knows that he’s long overdue a miracle.

Patterson’s captivating story draws readers into the fascinating Tarpon Springs. Aside of the factual aspects of this historic place, Patterson does a stellar job keeping his plot light by incorporating fantasy and spirituality to a topic that can be considered rather dismal—dealing with terminal illness and imminent death. A great mix of fact and fiction that is laced with hope and love, Epiphany Man is a perfect read for those looking for a fresh approach to fantasy literature.

Review by Anita Lock

She wants love, he wants the gold medal. The lines between love and obsession are blurred in this blend of dark romance and psychological thriller that combines the heat of Fifty Shades of Grey, the twists of Gone Girl, and the warped reality of Black Swan.

Rising romance author Lauren Rico spins a gripping tale of loss, love, and lies in book one of the Reverie series. A true storyteller, Rico grabs the attention of her audience from the get-go. Twisty and tantalizing, Reverie is bound to be a favorite among romance buffs with a love for classical music.

Review by Reverie

Ed Earl Burch is an ex-Dallas homicide detective tormented by memories of a dead partner and a killer snuffed before Burch could track him down. He’s a burnout, living drink by drink. Then Carla Sue Cantrell points a Colt 1911 at him and says the killer is still alive.

The first book in the Ed Earl Burch series, The Last Second Chance isn’t for everyone. Audiences who get a thrill out of Quentin Tarentino’s flicks will no doubt find Nesbitt’s plot captivating from beginning to end.

Review by Anita Lock

It’s 1854 in the American West and Didier Rain – rogue, poet, and would-be entrepreneur – is hired by The Church of the Restructured Truth to deliver a child-bride to the sect’s prophet across a frontier fraught with perils, comedy, and carnal temptations.

Kindall pulls out all the terminology stops in his latest read. Although a fascinating read laced with allegory and human interest, Delivering Virtue’s highest appeal will be toward seasoned readers, especially English literature aficionados. Others may enjoy the tongue-in-cheek comments, but miss nuances of European literary legends.

Review by Anita Lock

What if humanity’s greatest talents were concentrated into the hands of a lucky few? More specifically, in only sixteen people? Some would seek to serve themselves. Others would seek the help the world. And others still, to rule it.

Maybe you decide to dig into THE SIXTEEN BURDENS  because its (awesome) cover catches your eye. Or it might be the awards and slew of 5-star reviews that lure you in.  Either way, you’ll only need to read a few paragraphs to know your instinct was spot on. David Khalaf’s debut novel and the first book in THE BURDENS TRILOGY is an eclectic literary mashup — mystery mixed into urban fantasy with a backbeat of Hollywood’s Golden Age. While connecting the dots would be a tall order for a less talented raconteur, Khalaf delivers an engaging adventure grounded in the wondrous complexities of self-discovery and the power of friendship. Bonus: Francesca Baerald’s stellar illustrations.

Review by Yvonne Lieblein

A Mormon missionary, Jared Baserman, goes insane on his mission. Interests both virtuous and malevolent cozy up to Jared to make use of his “gifting.” But why in the hell would God choose someone as slope-shouldered as Jared—someone so unreligious, so strange? Is Jared really touched by God?

John Draper’s irreverent approach to spirituality is nothing less than downright refreshing. His unique debut maintains a nice balance between the holy and the profane from beginning to end. Offering his audience an intriguing and provocative read, A Danger to God Himself is perfect for those who appreciate reading about hypocrisy in organized religion while at the same time are doing a bit of soul searching. Comes highly recommended!!

Review by A Danger to God Himself

Alaana’s Way: The Calling is an epic fantasy with a unique arctic setting. Surrounding the story of Alaana who must go through the process to become the new Shaman for her tribe.

I can say so many great things about this novel, from the dialogue to the sweeping scenery to its solid editing. While I think Altabef succeeded bringing this ambitious vision to life, there were a few minor issues. Sometimes the switch between settings could be a bit jolting and confusing. Also, he often switched character perspectives from paragraph to paragraph, making the blending of the spiritual/physical characters difficult to sort out.  It tended to slow down in a few places, too. While Alaana’s interactions with her family, tribe and spirit creatures were fascinating (and well written), about halfway through the book I wanted the overarching conflict to reveal itself more clearly and the story to progress.

This cross-cultural fantasy epic may not be for everyone, but THE CALLING is my kind of book. Original in both scope and execution, I highly recommend it.

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

Can love sustain light when the forces of evil close in? Paris, 1939-1942. A fallen angel is trapped in the web of German occupation. The deadly noose of Nazi control grows ever tighter, ensnaring her and two of her lovers.

The book is beautifully written. The history is magnificent, and if you want to learn about occupied Paris from the perspective of persecuted Jewish families and Resistance fighters, this book is a fun way to do so. 

Review by A post with the ID $staff does not exist.

Margaret May Reis knows how strange she is; people have been telling her for years. At sixteen years old, though, Maggie begins to realize that strangeness is only half the story. Maggie isn’t just strange – she’s a witch.

The Witches of Armour Hill: Switch was a good YA read. It had lots of darkness, action, and coming of age angst and explores the challenges of being alone in the world with an edgy heroine who will likely appeal to teens. It offers great new world of witches that will likely only get better with additional books.

Review by Jennifer Ellis

Join Stanza on a tornadic quest into regional folklore, a string of historical murders, and the occult – and ultimately, into the mysteries behind her own bloody heritage and fey destiny. Between the suspense and the quality of writing, you won’t be able to leave aside this spellbinding first novel.

Ligatures is for readers who appreciate beautiful language and enjoy a story that both entertains and stimulates thought. It is on the dark side, and is not a simple “feel good” read. Instead, it is a novel with depth and complexity and power. Sara Rich is absolutely an author to watch.

Review by Ligatures